Saturday, October 25, 2014

Rabett Run: Confident Idiots

Rabett Run: Confident Idiots

5 comments:

Susan Astill said...

Wode vs woad - yes! I saw my spelling mistake as soon as I had pushed 'send'.
I can understand why you like the proposition put forward in this article. The alternative theory is that a 'cluttered mind' is reaching out for more ways to enhance an already well formed idea and stretch it further. Like spinning (and many other crafts)there are those who are technically very competent and then there is the intuitive crowd who add details and techniques that the conventional spinner would never allow and these spinners produce lovely, unconventional yarns (described as novelty yarns by the conventional crowd). There is room for clutter if some of the fragments stick to conventional methods and expand ideas. In our guild, there is a constant tension between the conventional, technically competent crowd and the free spirits. I hope I am a free spirit.........which begs the question 'why do I want to knit a traditional Gansey?'
I think 'anonymous' is right. Woad was easily available and cheap and likely held the colour better than other options. I doubt that cottage spinners were in a position to access of afford indigo.

Norman Kirk said...

How wonderfully ironic.

Anonymous said...

You're certainly confident.

Aaron said...

If one is going to do something new and different, one has to be confident because a lot of people will tell you that won't work.

Look at how many people told me knitting sheaths would not work.

Look at how many people told me swaving would not work.

Look at how many people told me DRS /spinning would not work.

They were all wrong. now I have these tools that allow me to work faster with less stress on my body.

My confidence has paid off-- hugely.

Aaron said...

Susan,
Many of the "cottage spinners" were producing the product demanded by some user. If the cottage spinner was going to earn income producing a product for that user, then the yarn was dyed according to the user's needs - and the user paid.

Aaron